Redefining Motherhood

Ep 35 - Ditching the Hustle Culture with Jennie Blumenthal

September 23, 2022 Lynn Turcotte-Schuh & Jennie Blumenthal Season 2 Episode 1
Redefining Motherhood
Ep 35 - Ditching the Hustle Culture with Jennie Blumenthal
Show Notes Transcript

After spending 20 years in Corporate America helping Fortune 500 companies manage multi-million dollar growth strategies, Jennie left her partnership in a global consulting firm to launch her own company. Besides her role as CEO, she also serves as a professional speaker, an Adjunct Professor in Strategy, a Board member, and the author of Corporate Rehab: Ditch the Hustle Culture and Thrive Again.

Her coaching and speaking business focuses on female executives looking to reach the next level of leadership without losing themselves in the process and on companies interested in building human-centered cultures. She lives in Washington, DC with her husband, two kids and Labrador puppy, and is trying to enjoy this chance to rewrite the next chapter of her career and life by running 10 milers, learning poetry, and joining an adult ice hockey league.

 What we discuss in this episode:

  • Jennie shares her story and explains what the "hustle culture" is and what the recovery process looks like when you reconnect with who you are and what you want rather than falling under the spell of Supermom/Hustle Culture.
  • "A woman's value is so often defined by how much she gives to other people". We discuss why this statement is so detrimental and how we can change our mindset and find the value in who we are as human beings.
  • Cues that help us know we're stuck in the hustle culture and how we can get ourselves out of it.
  • Jennie shares two stories from her book.
  • The REHAB framework for overcoming hustle culture: Recognize, Evaluate, Heal, Arise, Build
  • Anybody have mom-guilt when you take time for yourself? We chat about the importance of self-care and ignoring the "crazy lady in the attic".
  • Not sure where to start? Become aware of your thoughts, limiting beliefs and language that you're using with yourself.

 Resources and Links:

 Connect with Lynn on instagram @HappyMamaWellness. Looking for more support with parenting and motherhood? Get your first month in the Happy Mama Wellness Community here!

Connect with Lynn on instagram @HappyMamaWellness. Looking for more support with parenting and motherhood? Get your first month in the Happy Mama Wellness Community here!

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

Well listen, they're all about culture in the workplace and around here the culture is come as you are. Yes. And we love you for it. Great. Oh, here we go Hello and welcome to redefining motherhood, the podcast for Mamapreneur xers who really love their kiddos but are overwhelmed and burnt out from the day to day of motherhood. I am Lynn Turcotte-Schuh Mama mentor, founder of The Happy Mama Wellness community and your host. Redefining motherhood is all about letting go of society's expectations and digging deep to figure out what you want your motherhood experience to feel like, and you're not doing it alone. My guests and I are here to inspire you, motivate you and help you be a truly happy mama. So our guest today is Jenny Blumenthal, and she is joining us from Washington DC where she lives with her husband to middle schoolers. God bless you there and her yellow lab puppy who puppies are like having newborn again. Right. So basically, I have a third child there. Jenny left her executive job in 2020 to launch corporate rehab, which is a company that focuses on helping leaders thrive through coaching, speaking and workshops. And this is super exciting. Her very first book on the topic is out this October, and it is titled corporate rehab, ditch the hustle culture and thrive again. We're so excited to have Jenny with us, Jenny, welcome. Welcome to the podcast.

Jennie Blumenthal:

I'm so happy to be here. Thanks so much for having me.

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

Yes. So first of all, would you like to just kind of introduce yourself?

Jennie Blumenthal:

Yeah, I'm happy to. So you pretty much nailed it in the beginning, I the end of the story is that I left my job, or maybe the middle of the story, I should say the end of the corporate part of the story is that I left my job and 2020 It's the great resignation as everyone was trying to reevaluate what they wanted to do with their lives and whether this was working. And but the story really, for me started much before that. I am a native of Virginia. So my husband in college, we've got two kids. He's a surgeon and a practice. I'm a business woman, we're you know, running forward down these two independent but interdependent career tracks and, you know, doing all the things, we've got the kids and we've got the dog, and we've got the two careers. And meanwhile, as we both elevated in our careers, we just thought you know, we keep going until you know, we couldn't figure out how this is going to work anymore. And then we'd make shifts in the structure. And to do that, and I'm happy to go into more detail. I turned myself into a pretzel at times to be at all of the big sales and all of the volunteering and leading the teams. And so by the time 2020 came around, and it gave me a chance to really stop and say is this really the life that I want? I was pretty close to burnout and pretty exhausted. But we really didn't have those words back then, you know, in 2019, we didn't really understand you know what that looked like. And so part of my origin story is I'm I'm ambitious I am I think I'm pretty down to earth and friendly. And I really tried to be both of those people of like, I'll figure out how to climb this ladder and retain as much of my, you know, personality and warmth as I can. And I think the story that I tell, you know, in the book, and in my coaching and what I walk women through now is, you know where that those things became really hard to balance. And you know, what I would do differently and what I helped to coach women on as they think about, you know, going after ambitions in their lives, whether that's, you know, leading a church ministry, or whether that's being a CEO, a lot of the lessons are really similar. And so that's really what I focus on now and excited to share more of that with you as we go.

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

Hey, I'm so excited. Okay, so let's start off with the obvious the book is called ditch the hustle culture. So what what is hustle culture.

Jennie Blumenthal:

So hustle culture is just really a term for when everything has to be productive. You're always on the go. And you're racing, you're constantly responding to things. And really it can be it can show up as an executive trying to fit in all the business trips and trying to do all that they can, you know, on the job and it just as easily can show up. You know, for moms or dads at home. When we say oh my gosh, I have to get my kids into this camp. And if I don't get the piano lessons and the right bento box that I've seen on Facebook, my kids will be behind and it's all private. cated on this false myth of that we're run in this scarcity model that we're really like, there's not enough for everyone and I have to hustle and hurry up to make sure that you know, I get my piece of the pie, or that my kids don't miss out, or that I'm not the last one. And all of these things really, you know, kind of feed on each other. And they're all based on a set of, you know, stories that we tell ourselves or limiting beliefs. And part of what was so exciting for me as I went through my own recovery, and, and then wrote this book about it was getting to dig into some of the neuroscience and the physiology of what happens in our bodies when we're stuck and addicted to this hustle culture. And then also interviewing 300 Women for the book and hearing their stories, because I wanted to find out if I was the only one. And it turns out, unfortunately, I'm not. But it also means that we're in good company, because when we're able to tell stories, and do storytelling, then we don't have to feel so alone, that all of us are feeling some measure of this. And it shows up in different ways. And I think that, you know, for me finding out that so much of this was rooted in the hustle culture gave me you know, a sense or an understanding of there's things that I can do now to shift my mindsets and my behaviors. So I can choose to let that go. Or I can choose to decide how much of it, I want to be able to running my life versus how much I want intentional decisions to be in the driver's seat. So that's really what the hustle culture is and why it's so important to be aware of it.

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

I love that so much. And I love right at the beginning of that you use the word recovery, you said, you know, in my own recovery, and I was like, yes, that's exactly what it is. Right? We so in our community. And on this podcast, we talked a lot about redefining motherhood for each of us getting away from the supermom ideal, right that you have to be this certain way of the look this certain way you have to like it's like a part that you're supposed to play. And I had this like waking up this epiphany and my own journey. And I was like, I don't want that. I don't want that. I don't want to be that I don't want to do that. That's I don't want that life. And it was it was like a recovery process. It was it was like unlearning all these things to relearn what I really want my life to look like. And that's such a poignant word, their recovery. I love that you explained it like that. Yes. And I think

Jennie Blumenthal:

I think what's so interesting about that is, it's intentional is that part of the reason we get hooked on this hustle culture is when we're we're racing after these things that we think will fulfill us, we get really disconnected from ourselves. And that's really what you're talking about is then recovery is is involves reconnecting to yourself. And really brushing away the layers or the dirt or conditioning or beliefs are things you picked up to cope or to, you know, to achieve certain things in your life that might have served you for a certain time. But now it's about saying, Well, what part of me do I want to reconnect with or what part of myself do I want to bring forward and what part really served me well during the toddler years, but I'd like to retire her now. And maybe not eat lunch standing up anymore. And those types of things, I think, just help you reconnect with with the person that you were before you played all of these other roles. And I think for women, you mentioned this with moms why I think it's so important for women, traditionally, in the society in America today that we're living in, is the, the unfortunate thing, in my opinion, is that a woman's value is so often defined by the value she gives to other people. And so what's hard about that is when you're playing all these roles, what happened to me is it was very easy to lose myself in all of the benefit and the roles that I gave to other people, which I got a lot of praise for, oh my gosh, you're such a selfless mother, or Oh, my goodness, you're giving so much to the PTA or volunteering are your, you know, Sunday school teaching or oh my gosh, you always come to every pitch and help us out when someone needs help at work. And that's great. But the problem was I lost connection with the person who's at the middle of the Venn diagram of all of those roles. I couldn't really tell you who she was, versus who I needed to be in each moment, to try to take care of all the people in my life. And I think that that's just a perfect recipe for burnout unfortunately. And part of that recovery is really coming back to who you are the things that light you up what you really value at this point in your life and then making some intentional choices to reflect that.

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

Love that you just you just summarized redefining motherhood in that one sentence. That is what it's all about. And A lot of our audience, a lot of our listeners are Mamapreneur as well. And so they may not be out of the home in corporate America, but they're doing the same balancing act, the same juggling act. And and I don't like to say that you're losing yourself necessarily, but like, it's you get so far down on the list. It's like you become invisible, like your needs become invisible. So I love that so much. I find it very difficult because I'm caught up in this myself still some days, right? I had the epiphany, I'm still in recovery. I'm still in recovery. All right, I think lifeline like 7030. And now like, 7030, I'm getting closer. But I quite often will like, ignore, ignore, ignore. And then my body's like, you're not ignoring me anymore. And it'll hit me with with something. And we talked at the beginning, before we started recording that I'm, I'm on like, week two of a lingering migraine and like I frustrated with myself, because I know that I did a lot of it to myself, I was not taking care of myself, I was not doing the things I know I'm supposed to do. I made myself last again, which I had worked really hard to not do. And so I'm wondering if you can share with us some of the either stories that you have gotten from your book, or just insights that you've gotten through through doing this work with with people with women, like what are some of the cues, maybe that we miss are what are like, how do we know that we're in this hustle culture? Like how do we recognize that so we can get ourselves out of it? Like, what are some of the things we should be looking for? Yes, that's

Jennie Blumenthal:

a great question. So I like to focus on looking at three dimensions, which is your mind, your body and your soul, when you're looking at cues from from you to you. And the first one is mindsets. And when you think about if you start to actually listen to the stories we tell ourselves, or limiting beliefs, some people call them. And it's really the story that's going on in your head that you might not catch. And if you start to pay attention to that, and actually say it out loud, the first thing to notice is whether you would say that to a friend or someone you just met. Or if that was such a mean thing that you would never imagine even saying it to an enemy. And I think that's one thing that's just really important to start catching ourselves on. Things like I should have done that better, I should have known that my kid would, you know, stumble over here on that, you know, on the sidewalk, and I should have had extra band aids or I should have washed their hands 10 times when we left the doctor's office, I wouldn't be sick. I shouldn't go faster. I should have gotten more done today. I should you know, and so many of those types of things we tell ourselves are rooted in these limiting beliefs. Like, there's not enough, I've got a hurry, or I'm not enough, I need to do more. And you wouldn't necessarily label it. I'm not enough. But it comes out as a symptom. If it kind of all comes back to this root cause of maybe there's part of you that feels like you need to be more you're not enough. And so just that story alone, if you say it out loud and say, Oh boy, I would never say that to someone and recognize that you can do it through meditation, sometimes it's a good way to kind of capture and be able to observe your thoughts or just, I forced myself to say it out loud. And it's so embarrassing, or so it seems so mean that I have to then just go ahead and reframe it. So that's one thing that helps. And Tara brach actually has a wonderful methodology for this called rain where you recognize the thought you allow it, you don't judge yourself for thinking it. you investigate underneath it and say, Why do I feel like I'm not enough, you know, and what's going on there. And then the end is you immediately give yourself nurturing and compassion and say I'm just enough exactly in this moment. So that's the first way you can tell is if there's this loop, you know, and if you're one of the rare women that says I'm doing everything great, then you're in good shape, you know,

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

I am not one of those women. Okay, I will just let you know right now, I am not one of those women.

Jennie Blumenthal:

And if you're listening to this, I'm sure that you could probably work relate to the, to the not enough piece and everything's okay. So the second piece is our bodies. And what's interesting part of when we do meditation, part of the reason is what we're trying to do is get out of our own heads and let the thinking brain turn off for a little bit and actually force some of this awareness into our bodies. And I know you know tons of this because you you do so much of this work, but what our bodies are doing all the time is sending us signals and if we're not paying attention because we're too stuck in our brains than our bodies just get louder. And so it's interesting that as I started to interview these when managers ask them, you know, do you feel what do you feel like you're stuck in when you're trying to lose your job, or you're trying to leave your job? And you know, what, what role does the hustle culture play. And I noticed that so many of them started to tell me about a time almost, you know, off handedly, that some big physical ailment happened around the same time. And I started to put it together that wait a minute, this isn't random. One woman told me that she had, she was so stressed out in her job. And she knew she was doing too much and running too fast. And she was in this big executive position, she walked into her living room as she were into her kitchen, as she was working from home in the beginning of the pandemic, and was trying to eat a salad so quickly, so she could get back to our conference calls. And she was so stressed out that she completely passed out and actually hit her head, crashed through the drywall in the kitchen and was, you know, on the floor by the time her husband came to find her. And I just thought that was such an incredible example of, you know, there's probably all these signals in her body saying slow down, take a breath, take care of yourself, and she's pushing through. And finally, your body says no more, we're just going to shut down. And you know, and hopefully that's a wake up call. And for her it was she actually left her job did a month long yoga immersion, and now has transitioned into being a successful entrepreneur. So I thought that was an interesting one. And then another one, I had a woman who said, you know, she knew something was off in her job. And she had had to miss her daughter's second birthday, because she had to be on a plane somewhere else. And she could feel the stress. But she was sure she could make it, she could just get to the next job or the next project. And that would bring a little stability. And as she was going through this description, she said, You know, one thing I noticed was I started to throw up, but it was only between Monday and Friday, every morning before work, I would go in the bathroom, I'd throw up. And then I'd go to work. And it didn't happen on Saturdays and Sundays. And I thought that was pretty strange. And I saw a doctor and they said, Well, maybe this is related to work stress. And I asked her Wow, that was interesting. Your body was literally rejecting, you know, the stress? And how long did that go on for? And she said, Well, it was about a year and a half. I can't imagine tolerating but we do this right? We say no, no, we're just gonna push right through it and her body was screaming at her like something's not right. And you need to change. And it really took you know that that type of, you know, physical ailment for her to really put the pieces together. And she shifted into a different job that just gave her a little bit more balance and not quite the same amount of stress. So I think that's the second piece that our bodies are constantly sending us signals. A lot of times it's it's, you know, in our gut because we have almost as many neurons in our brains as we do in our, in our gut, which is kind of interesting based on evolution and how that all came to be. So a lot of times it's this tightness in our gut, a lot of times it's it's constriction in our heart area, you know, heart disease is the number one killer of women still, and it's kind of interesting that we're loving all these people so well. And we're so apt to under so much stress that that's usually where it shows up. So I think those two things are good examples of things to look for within the body. And then the last piece is just within the soul, there's sometimes things that just cannot be explained in all different religions and cultures where you just get, you know, a sign that something else has to change. For me, I actually decided to leave my job and read a letter that I had written myself seven years prior, where I had kind of explained everything that led up to quitting. And I had no idea that like seven years before, I was in a totally different city, different job and everything, but I had kind of said, you know, you're gonna get to this point, and you're just gonna burn out. And so it was kind of interesting to read that letter that I had written to myself, you know, a long time ago and realize, well, there's part of my soul that knew this needed to happen. And I was not going to listen, I was just going to keep racing from it. So I think those are three different dimensions to tap into just to see whether the hustle culture is something that is playing an outsized role in your life.

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

I love that so much. Okay, so we're checking in with our thoughts, because we want to get get those limiting beliefs. We talked about limiting beliefs a lot in our community. We gotta get those in check, and we got to reprogram, reprogram them to tell the truth. We call them the crazy lady in the attic. Yeah, we got to check in with our body and not ignore the 5 million little signal that it's sending to us every day. Pay attention to that. And then just check in with our soul or spirit and make sure that our inner being right is doing okay, that's there. We talk about self care a lot in parenting and The Self is your like essential being like, that's the definition of self as your essential being like, there's only one of you a whole world. So let's honor it. I love those three steps that was so helpful. And I'm repeating them for myself. Moreover, anybody else to like, make sure that I have it. So, so we've identified that we're stuck in this, this hustle culture. Now, what do we do? What are what are like maybe one or two tactical tips that we can, you know, action steps we can take to try and and get ourselves out or stuck start that that recovery process? Obviously, it's going to take a long time, but what are some things that we can do to get started? Yep. Well, and actually, that's part of where, why I wrote the book, because there's so many women I speak to that say, oh, gosh, that is me. Hot word.

Jennie Blumenthal:

What do I do next, right. And part of the reason I wrote it was because it was me too. I thought, Okay, I'll start consuming all these podcasts and books and articles. And it got so overwhelming, I didn't know where to start and how to actually follow a process that felt like it would be manageable. And so what I did is I organized all of that with research and the stories that I've collected into this five step framework that follows the letters of rehab. So the first step is recognize your life story and understand what was the context for some of the things that you believe and, and your values so that you understand kind of what's playing in the background of your subconscious. The second step is evaluate, and that's for your patterns and relationships. So that's really where those limiting beliefs start to come in. And if I had to pick one thing for you to do next, it's really just pay attention to those thoughts. That's probably the first step and just understand what's going on in the background. And what does that crazy lady say? start capturing it, because firstly, first you need to understand what what's going on there. The third step is heal. And that's Heal your mind, body, and spirit. And there's all kinds of ways to do that, whether that's walks in nature, or meditation, or yoga, or just starting to tap into your breathing, there's a number of different things to experiment with there. The fourth is arise and reconnect with yourself. And that is actually the fun part. That's where you play and look at the things that bring you energy and your gifts and your strengths and really start to tap into purposefully. What are the things that you want to bring towards the world? What are the biggest world problems that you want to solve? What are the things you want to do within the four walls of your home? What kind of relationships do you want, and really start to dream about what those things are. And then the final step is build new dimensions of your career in life. And usually, this is where with my coaching clients, and in my workshops, will actually build a little roadmap because for Type A planners like me, it's helpful to have something I can check off and say, Okay, I'm only committing to these things this quarter, or this week, or this month. But they all build towards these new patterns and mindsets that I want to take on. So that's really it. The the rehab framework, I think, is a good way to just get started with some of these. And there's all kinds of exercises and things within each. But the first step I think is really just starting with, you know, thinking a little bit about what's running between your ears, and what are those mindsets, so that you can start to you know, think about those a little bit more purposefully and decide which ones you want to replace with newer thoughts.

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

I love that so much. I love that it's a framework. And I'm assuming this is in the book. I'm excited for the presale, because I want to get my hands on this book. But I'm assuming that rehab framework is in there. Yet, is it? Yes, yes. So we're recognizing we're evaluating. We're healing a rising in building. It's so brilliant. I love that that acronym. And I think I think that this is such an important message. And I really hope that the listeners are taking this to heart because especially as moms, right as women, but even more so as moms, many times default parents, we really just take on the weight of the world on our shoulders. And if we don't, if we don't stop and recognize that that's not our job, that's not our responsibility. It's gonna crush us. It's just gonna crush us. So I love all of this information. And I love that that's the first step is just this recognition, this awareness. Right? It's brilliant. And I spoke with a mom. It was it was a couple of weeks ago it was recently it was one of the on one of our coaching calls. And she said to me, I know that I need to do this thing for myself this you know XY and Z i need to Do the stretches for my back. And I need to do you know, this thing for my my diet and I need to do a walk out in nature to clear my head. But when we dug down underneath her statement was, but I'm a bad mom when I take time away from what could be time for my kids or for the house or for this and I was like, whoa, whoa, timeout. This is a crazy lady in the attic. Right? So I just wanted to, to bring light to like, I feel like that's the core issue here, especially for a lot of our listeners is where we don't want to be a bad mom, like, we want to give our kids the best of ourselves. But then we have nothing left to give, because we just keep draining and draining, draining. So I am excited to get this book and read it and Institute Institute. I don't even know that three word to start working on this rehab framework, I think is very brilliant. So having said all that, can you please tell us when? When can we get our hands on the book? Where can we get the book? Like give us all of the details here? Yes, yes,

Jennie Blumenthal:

yes. So pre sales are happening now. And it will officially launch October 18. And I'm really excited about that that piece there's going to be a couple of in person events, which will all be listed on the website, which I know is in the show notes of corporate dash rehab.com. But there's also a number of zooms and virtual workshops that I'm adding as we go into the fall and winter. And everybody's you know, debating getting on airplanes, we'll try to do some remote things that you might be able to catch during a nap time or on a lunch break. So that we can make sure we accommodate as many folks as possible. But it'll be for sale on the website and Amazon and it select bookstore. So that'll all be listed on the website. And I'm pretty excited, I feel like there'll be some really cool things going on this fall, I'm going to do a physical launch in DC and another in New York. So for any listeners who are in either of those locations, there'll be some cool events coming up and some partnerships, which I'll announce soon. So I can't wait to share it and really shine a light on the stories that these women entrusted me to share with the rest of you.

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

Brilliant. I'm so excited. And I know we've been alluding to the book a lot. But you do other things as well, you support women and in other ways. So can you just share what other ways people might be able to connect with your work with you. We want to make sure people know how to find your beautiful energy.

Jennie Blumenthal:

I appreciate that. Yes. So the other parts of my business is both coaching and speaking. And so I do corporate events where I speak to companies about how to actually create thriving cultures. And that's really for mixed audiences at any level, where we go through talking about the Thrive model that's in the book that after you've done the rehab, there's the thriving, and really what that looks like. I think women are natural born like born leaders, whether they're leaders in their home, in their community, in a workplace. In fact, there's, there's a philosopher that believes the word home is really meant to be the world. So yes, we're a woman's place in the home of Earth, you know, in any dimension, you're in which I just love. And so when we think that way, all of these things are applicable, whether you're talking about your relationship with your children, with yourself with, you know, your leaders in a business setting. And so that's really what I do for corporations, I've got a couple of exciting companies that we're speaking to this fall, which I'll share a little bit more on the website soon. And then for individuals, I have three different courses that I run. One is the rehab course where we do six sessions of executive coaching exercises, you read the book, we talk through pieces, chapters at a time and go through specific exercises to really do your own rehab, where I'm pretty much teaching you how to do those things, one on one, and we talk about some of the things that came up for you. And then shifting into an actual roadmap that we build together from all of those healthy habits. That's part of the healed chapter, which is really fun, because it's fun to hear. I've got clients that have decided to take improv classes that have moved to Montana for the summer and work remotely. They have done all kinds of fun things just to and they've said this has given them a push to really, you know, claim some of that time and do things a little bit more intentionally versus on autopilot. So that one is kind of the signature course that I think everybody should go through because it's a little bit about what do you want to do next? And a little bit about, you know, understanding some of the more personal things like limiting beliefs, there's a shorter course, which is three different sessions. And that's reset. And that's really for women who are looking to pivot. They're looking to leave a job and do something else. And they need some resume help or some thoughts about how to do that. We start with why and what your purpose is, what's holding you back. And then what do you need to do next. And then the final one is Ries and that's for my female entrepreneurs, who are launching or scaling businesses. And I've got folks that are just starting and women that are running $3 million platforms. And we really focus on what it's applying a lot of the same concepts, but what's holding them back from the vision they want to get to in their business. And then a little bit more strategic and tactical help around building a pipeline about scaling and looking at operations so that we can really fine tune the product, and then help them get ready to scale to the next level. And so those are the three major courses. I also do quarterly workshops with women, which is fun, because it's in a little bit of a group setting. And I find that you know, women teach each other, you know, bet better than anybody else. So it's really exciting to watch that work and learn from each other. So that's just an example of some of the other ways that that you can find me.

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

I love it. I love it so much. Thank you for sharing all of that. And as we wrap things up here, I always ask our guests, if you could give a struggling mom, right? Probably in the first early years, you have middle schoolers, so you have different struggles right now, but a mom that that's trying to be supermom right now, and really wants to redefine that motherhood for herself. What one piece of advice would you give her? Wow,

Jennie Blumenthal:

I would tell her that she is so important. And it's really, you know, it's really hard to do it all. But you don't have to do it all you have to do the things that are most important to you. And so it does get easier, but part of it is is really acknowledging what's hard and saying that out loud. I wish as a young mom that I had said to my boss, to my husband to my mother, these are the things that are really hard and this is what I actually need support with and there's no shame in that and I think that's something that everybody should should really take to heart because there is no supermom I got you know, so excited when people would say your suit, you're Superwoman you're doing it all. But inside I knew I wasn't and that just made it even worse. So I would just say, you know, go for the 70% and love your people well, and you can't go wrong.

Lynn Turcotte-Schuh:

I love that so much. Perfect way to close this out. Jenny, thank you so much for, for sharing your expertise and yourself today and taking some time out to chat with us. This was really wonderful.

Jennie Blumenthal:

Thanks for having me land. I'm so excited for everything you've got going on. And it was so happy to be here.